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Subject-verb agreement is a crucial aspect of the English language that every writer must master. It involves ensuring that the subject and verb in a sentence agree in number. For example, when the subject is singular, the verb must also be singular, and when the subject is plural, the verb must also be plural. This can be confusing, especially for non-native speakers of English or those who are just starting to learn the language.

One of the best ways to improve your subject-verb agreement skills is through practice. Paragraph exercises with answers in PDF format are an excellent resource for this. These exercises provide you with a series of paragraphs, each containing multiple sentences that require subject-verb agreement corrections. By going through these exercises, you can identify common mistakes and improve your understanding of this essential grammar rule.

To get the most out of these exercises, it is essential to pay attention to the instructions provided. Each exercise has specific rules that you must follow, such as identifying the subject and verb in each sentence or selecting the correct form of the verb. Additionally, be sure to read each sentence carefully, as some may have hidden subjects that are not immediately apparent.

Here are some examples of subject-verb agreement exercises:

Exercise 1: Identify the subject and verb in each sentence and ensure that they agree in number.

1. The cat and dog (is/are) sleeping.

2. My friend or I (am/is) going to the party.

3. The books on the shelf (belongs/belong) to the library.

Answers: 1. The cat and dog are sleeping. 2. My friend or I am going to the party. 3. The books on the shelf belong to the library.

Exercise 2: Select the correct form of the verb that agrees with the subject.

1. Each of the students (has/have) completed their homework.

2. The committee (discuss/discusses) the issue at their meeting.

3. Neither the cat nor the dog (likes/like) to be alone.

Answers: 1. Each of the students has completed their homework. 2. The committee discusses the issue at their meeting. 3. Neither the cat nor the dog likes to be alone.

By practicing exercises like these, you can improve your subject-verb agreement skills, which will ultimately lead to clearer and more effective writing. Keep in mind that these exercises are just a starting point, and you should continue to work on mastering this grammar rule by reading, writing, and practicing regularly.